Can we “do life” better?

 

Can we live in ways which more positively meet our deepest human needs?

 

This resource is dedicated to exploring these questions through a collection of perspectives from personal life, clinical practice and scientific enquiry.

 

The first books give insights into the experience of one young person and her family as they faced adversity and honestly embraced change, loss and death but found strength and richness on the journey.

 

Further publications with different perspectives will follow.

 

£3.99 excluding P&P

A Treasure Lost; a Treasure Gained

Reflections on a journey through childhood cancer

This story, of child with a brain tumour, allows glimpses into how a family faced loss of health, the shadow of possible death, despair and frailty with hope, courage and faith.

Printed Copy

Electronic Download (PDF)

£1.99

£3.99 excluding P&P

Dying without Fear

Reflections from a young artist’s journey with cancer

A 26 year old woman is told she has a malignant brain tumour and might only have months to live. Her journal later carried this entry:

“I place myself on the threshold of dying so that I may live each day and each moment as a gift.”
Where did this refusal to be afraid of dying come from, this determination to live life to the full, despite limitations, and with an unshakeable hope?

This book, which is a selection of some of her poetry and journal entries, illustrates the inner turmoil yet profound peace she experienced, as she prepared to die.

Printed Copy

Electronic Download (PDF)

£1.99

 

£4.50 excluding P&P

Honouring Personhood in Patients

Dr Ross Bryson

This book is in part a description of how some health professionals working in the National Health Service in Britain have sought to ensure that the uniqueness of each individual patient is not lost in the drive to deliver scientific medical care to a wide range of people in a resource-limited context.

However, it is more than a historical description of some trends and changes in British General Practice. It has a deeply ethical core focused on the significance of human beings in their complexity and fullness. It touches on the deepest longings of every human being. Each of us intrinsically knows that we are all more than the sum of our separate components; that each human life is somehow unique and of inestimable value; and that personhood has a transcendent quality which defies measurement. Indeed, we all hope that when we are unwell or vulnerable that our uniqueness will be valued and honoured by those from whom we seek care.

Printed Copy

Electronic Download (PDF)

£2.00

 

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